GOJR 100

23. Thelonious Monk - Brilliant Corners (1956)

6 monk brilliant cornersThe most important musicians are those who successfully create their own original world of music with its own rules, logic and surprises. Thelonious Monk is one of those people. This was Monk's third album for Riverside and what sets it apart from his previous work is the originality of the material. There's an inescapable freshness and vitality in every track on the album, helped partly by the support Monk receives from Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, Oscar Pettiford and Ernie Henry.

24. Miles Davis – Miles Smiles (1967)

miles davis quintet miles smilesWith this album the second Miles Davis Quintet really began to hit their stride, delving deeper into the more adventurous, exploratory side of their signature sound. This is music that demands attention, never taking predictable paths or easy choices. It's a great triumph that shows adventurousness within the music that is warm and accessible.This is a classic Blue Note album, with Horace Silver the master at balancing the jumping rhythms and complex harmonies, providing a unique blend of earthiness and sophistication. Recorded at a time when Bossa nova was still popular, it added a degree of the exotic, mixed with rhythms and modes from overseas.

25. Herbie Hancock - Head Hunters (1973)

herbie hancocks famous head hunters rediscovered on the vinyl factorys roots branchesHead Hunters was a pivotal point in Herbie Hancock's career, bringing him into the vanguard of jazz fusion. Hancock had pushed avant-garde boundaries on earlier albums, and with his band the Headhunters he developed a deeply funky album with all the sensibilities of jazz. Although he experienced the usual scorn from the purists he produced an album that sounded fresh and vibrant. Featured musicians include Bennie Maupin, Paul Jackson, Bill Summers and Harvey Mason..

26. Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil (1965)

Speak No Evil Wayne ShorterAlways looking at innovation, this album has a collection of highly original and unusual compositions, with Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter playing leading roles. The swing is gentle but pronounced and full of Shorter's singular lyricism as a player and composer.

27. Mary Lou Williams – Zoning (1974)

Mary Lou WilliamsAfter a long period working in the Catholic church, Mary Lou Williams re-emerged in the early '70s resume her ever stimulating career as a jazz pianist. Zoning is one of her finest, with performances by Bob Cranshaw, Mickey Roker and Zita Carno. Rather than sounding like a veteran of the 1920s, Mary Lou Williams sounds 40 years younger on this recording, showing the influence of McCoy Tyner, and in places hints at free jazz.

28. The Horace Silver Quintet - Song for My Father (1964)

Song for My Father (Horace Silver album cover art)This is a classic Blue Note album, with Horace Silver the master at balancing the jumping rhythms and complex harmonies, providing a unique blend of earthiness and sophistication. Recorded at a time when Bossa nova was still popular, it added a degree of the exotic, mixed with rhythms and modes from overseas.

29. John Coltrane - My Favourite Things (1960)

John Coltrane 1961 My Favorite ThingsA landmark album, recorded in less than three days. It signalled the move towards the more avant-guarde, with Coltrane playing with ease, supported by McCoy Tyner, Steve Davis and Elvin Jones. A joy to listen to

30. Archie Shepp – Attica Blues (1972)

Archie Shepp Attica BluesRefining his large-ensemble experiments of 1971, this album was one of Shepp's most significant post-'60s statements, recorded just several months after authorities ended the uprising in Attica prison in New York state by massacring 43 inmates and hostages. This is one of his most successful large-group projects, because his skilful handling of so many different styles of black music produced such tremendously groovy results.

31. Oliver Nelson - The Blues & the Abstract Truth (1961)

Oliver TruthKnown chiefly as a bandleader, this album gave Oliver Nelson the opportunity to show off the musician in him. He assembled one of the most potent modern jazz sextets ever. Freddie Hubbard, Eric Dolphy, Bill Evans, Paul Chambers and Roy Haynes bring indisputable beauty through a three-part horn harmony fronting Hubbard's lead melody.

32. Freddie Hubbard - Open Sesame (1960)

open sesame CD largeFreddie Hubbard's first recording as leader, Open Sesame features the 22-year-old trumpeter in a quintet with tenor saxophonist Tina Brooks, up-and-coming pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Clifford Jarvis. This set shows that even at this early stage, Hubbard had the potential to be one of the greats.

33. Wes Montgomery - Incredible Jazz Guitar (1960)

wes montgomeryincredible jazz guitarThis was his fourth album. Most of its tracks are considered to be the best examples of Wes Montgomery's two distinguishing techniques: "thumb picking" and the use of octaves. Accompanied by Tommy Flanagan and brothers Percy and Albert Heath, this recording shows Montgomery's amazing talents.

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